App Review
iMovie

Powerful, pro-quality HD movie maker is easy enough for beginners

  • Watch full screen footage in Video mode; speed up, slow down video, click heart to save in favorites.

  • Theater mode holds all your finished iMovies and lets you share them via AirPlay and iCloud (account required, watch storage limits).

  • Where it all comes together: assemble and edit video, photos, music in the timeline (bottom of screen), view content stored in iMovie Media (upper right), and watch project in realtime in quarter-screen display (upper left).

  • In-app templates help set mood with theme-based styles, fonts, and music; iMovie has 8 movie templates and 14 movie trailer templates.

  • iMovie's trailer templates contain customizable storyboards so kids can map out and create exciting, Hollywood-style movie trailers.

Quick Take
Pros: Portable, powerful video production tools with an easy-to-use interface give kids endless movie-making possibilities.
Cons: Lacks compositing special effects feature (i.e. green screen or Chroma key); sharing across email, text, and social media may be too easy.
Bottom Line: Extraordinariary tool for making movies anywhere -- easy enough for beginners, yet has lots of headroom for advanced users.
Learning Scores
Engagement Is the product stimulating, entertaining, and engrossing? Will kids want to return?
Placing kids in the director's seat is empowering. Streamlined, multi-touch interface invites kids and offers astounding HD results. Add and import video or photos with ease, and from various devices.
Pedagogy Is learning content seamlessly baked-in, and do kids build conceptual understanding? Is the product adaptable and empowering? Will skills transfer? 4
Intuitive interface lays out distinct sections, with a clear and uncluttered workspace. Edit and add effects easily with multi-touch gestures.
Support Does the product take into account learners of varying abilities, skill levels, and learning styles? Does it address both struggling and advanced students? 4
While there's no in-app demo, extensive help is located at the "?" and gives pop-up, sticky note-style tips for specific tasks. Web-based help offers extensive support. All clips and projects are stored in-app or in iCloud, can be shared easily.
Our Review
What's It Like?

iMovie is a powerful and portable video production app for creating stunning HD movies and trailers. The app's streamlined interface is clutter free and relatively easy to use. Kids first choose a template (8 for movies, 14 for trailers), then shoot or import video, photos, and audio. Intuitive, multi-touch gestures let kids assemble and edit media in the app's timeline – double tap to add clips, pinch to compress, tap and drag to trim and sequence clips, swipe to scroll through a project. There's an undo button to rid unwanted edits and a microphone button to add voiceover through the device's built-in mic or an external mic (for best audio quality). But this much power doesn't come without a huge download size (635 MB). Keep this in mind to best manage in-app storage space.

Outside of the timeline are three main sections: Video is equivalent to a library and displays mini-timelines of clips. Projects shows thumbnails of completed or projects in-progress. Single-tap a Project thumbnail to see its information and sharing options, which include email, Facebook, You Tube, Vimeo, and CNN iReport. Theater houses all shared movies, trailers, and clips in one location for easy viewing (iCloud account is required). The in-app help has an indexed Table of Contents, feature-specific pop-up sticky-notes, and a handy keyword search field.

Is It Good For Learning?

If you want to make movies with relative ease and in 1080p HD quality, with pro-like production and editing tools driven by multi-touch gestures, all with anywhere portability, then iMovie's a smart choice (especially now that it's free for iOS devices registered from September 2013 on). There's likely a learning curve for younger students and for those who don't have prior movie-making experience, but the in-app help is great and iMovie's web-based support community is beyond vast. Once kids grasp how the app works, they'll take over the director's seat and create amazing movies and trailers that can easily be shared among Apple devices, and online through email and various social networks.

iMovie's lack of advanced video effects (most notably, video compositing, i.e. green screen) and it's limited ability to format title fonts really don't distract from its powers. Not only is iMovie a great movie-making app to document school activities, but it's also a powerful tool to teach cinematography, story structure, visual composition, video editing and sound production. The bonus is that iMovie works seamlessly with all of Apple's creativity and productivity apps (mobile and otherwise), so compatibility's a breeze with GarageBand, iPhoto, iTunes, Pages, Numbers, and Keynote.

How Can Teachers Use It?

There are countless ways to use iMovie in the classroom, from making movies based on kid's original writings, to creating a trailer of their favorite author's book, to making mock-commercials or promotional videos to support school-based projects. Kids will benefit from learning some simple videography skills, too, which can transform any video or photography projects from good to jaw-droppingly great. Introduce cinematic techniques such as rule of thirds, balancing elements, leading lines, symmetry and patterns, viewpoint, background, depth of field, to name a few.

This review of iMovie was written by

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